Biotech Buyouts

I can imagine that a few people were waiting for President Obama to follow up his declaration that he was opening up the East Coast shelf for oil drilling with a hearty “April Fools!” but he didn’t.  

 

It’s for real.   

 

The decision to open up the East Coast shelf is sure to anger some people. Former Florida governor Jeb Bush was adamantly opposed to drilling off of Florida’s coast, even when his brother George pondered the idea. He felt that oil drilling might spoil Florida’s beaches and impact tourism.   

 

I don’t know how current governor Charlie Crist feels about offshore drilling, but there will be plenty of vocal opposition. Imagine the irony as both environmentalists and conservative politicians lambaste Obama for this decision to open up oil drilling! 

Oil is a Coiled Spring

Stocks were following the game plan nicely yesterday. The dollar was down against the euro, and stocks and commodities were rallying nicely.  

 

It all fell apart when European Central Bank president Jean-Claude Trichet called the inclusion of the IMF in the Greek bailout plan “very bad.”   

 

I see his point – this was a great opportunity for Europe to come together and handle the Greek debt matter in-house. Of course, we know Germany was resisting. And in the end, Germany got its way. 

Germany and the euro

The S&P 500 moved back down for retest of 1,165 support/resistance point yesterday. That important level held, but it’s interesting to see what lead to the retest.   

 

Basically, yesterday’s decline was the result of currency values. The U.S. dollar rose against the euro as more signs of dissension in the European Union add uncertainty to the future of the euro.  

 

The root cause of the dissension, the ongoing debt issues in Greece and now in Portugal, is somewhat irrelevant. Greece will get the bailout loans it needs. And whether they come cheaply from the IMF or a bit more expensive from the EU central bank, they will come.   

 

The overriding issue is that Germany is demanding IMF involvement. Other European countries see this as an internal matter for the EU to solve. From that perspective, we can see the Greek debt solution as a chance for the EU to demonstrate its cohesion.  

 

And Germany is throwing a monkey wrench into the whole thing. 

50% Off

That was quite a show Maguire Properties (NYSE:MPG) put on yesterday after it reported 4th quarter earnings. It opened down, around $2.50 a share, and then marched steadily higher for the rest of the day to close at $3.54.   

 

Maguire’s cash reserves are rising after it walked away from a few underwater properties and sold a couple others. Investors seem to be saying the stock is on more solid ground now – volume was monstrous.  

 

While I’d love for Daily Profit readers to have participated in yesterday’s gains, I stand by my recommendation to take your profits on the stock before earnings. Earnings are a big uncertainty. Maguire could just as easily have dropped yesterday. There’s always risk when investing, and perhaps more so with a stock like Maguire. It would have been irresponsible of me not to have you take profits before earnings. 

Google and China

The financial media is jumping to the conclusion that recent weakness for stock prices is related to the ongoing Greek bailout saga. But considering that Greece would prefer to have the IMF involved in its bailout plans because emergency loans would be cheaper, I’d suggest we need to look elsewhere for the real cause of the recent mini-sell-off.  

 

The Indian rate hike is certainly a more likely candidate. Not because India’s economy is driving the global economy, but because this move is another sign that central banks around the world are ending their stimulus policies.   

 

India’s move comes a full month ahead of the next scheduled central bank meeting. The timing suggests that perhaps inflation is becoming problematic. And it also raises the possibility that India will hike rates again when it meets next month.   

 

Don’t underestimate the significance of Google’s (Nasdaq:GOOG) possible exit from the Chinese market. 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! In honor of the holiday, the stock market is in the green. The Fed reiterated its pledge to keep interest rates low for an extended time. The promise of cheap money is clearly helping to support stock valuations.

Also helping move prices higher, and supporting the Fed’s stance, is the 0.6% drop in the Producer Price Index. The drop was led by food and fuel prices. Excluding those, the so-called "core" rate climbed 0.1%.

You wouldn’t know fuel prices were lower looking at the price for a barrel of oil. Despite the relative strength of the U.S. dollar, oil has staged a month long rally that’s got it within spitting distance of its 52-week highs. And I expect we’ll be seeing those highs in the very near future.

Sovereign Wealth Fund and Commercial Real Estate

The AP is reporting that China has trimmed its holdings of U.S. Treasury’s by $5.8 billion in January. I’m sure members of the doom and gloom economic faction will point to this as solid evidence that the U.S. is losing its ability to fund spending and is inching ever closer to default.   

 

In my opinion, this line of thinking is completely unrealistic.   

 

China still holds $889 billion in T-bills. It’s clearly not “dumping” American debt. And as I discussed last week, there is evidence that China is moving to more direct investments in the U.S.  

 

China’s state-run investment company, the China Investment Corporation (CIC), is already involved in a buyout offer for shopping mall owner General Growth Properties (NYSE:GGP) through Brookfield Asset Management (NYSE:BAM)

Reader Mail

Stocks continue their upward climb. As TradeMaster’s Jason Cimpl  told us earlier in the week, the S&P 500 has kept its date with 1,150. And it looks poised to move higher.   

 

The retail sales data from February is positive. Despite two crippling blizzards on the East Coast, sales still rose 0.3%. And if you strip out autos, sales were up 0.8%.   

 

Normally, it makes no sense to ignore auto sales because they are obviously an important gauge of consumer spending, but in light of the recalls from Toyota (NYSE:TM), it’s reasonable to assume that some auto sales were simply postponed due to the uncertainty.    

 

Sales were especially strong for electronics and at restaurants and bars. Sounds like consumers are celebrating their new iPhone purchase over a beer. That’s probably led to a surge in drunk-texting.   

 

Retail sales from January have now been revised lower two times, from an initial reading of +0.5% to the current +0.1%. Funny thing about this rally – economic data is consistently revised lower, and no one cares. The only exception I can think of is 4Q 2009 GDP, which was actually revised slightly higher.  

 

Economic data has been improving. But it says more about the bullishness of investors that they are consistently overlooking negative data. That gives me more confidence that we will be seeing new highs for the major indices soon.   

 

Now, let’s wrap up our week with some Reader Mail… 

Anniversary, Part II

I suppose it’s fitting that futures should be down on the morning of the one-year anniversary of the stock market bottom last year. Perhaps stocks will put in a similar reversal today, but even if they don’t, I think we can take a little selling in stride.   

 

Oil prices are down a bit today as the dollar strengthens. We should note that the dollar and oil have moved higher in tandem lately, proving that there is more to the strength in oil prices than its relationship to the U.S. dollar.   

 

Expectations for the global economic recovery and a subsequent rise in demand for oil are part of it. But I also think that investors are slowly realizing that there is very little upside for production levels in non-OPEC countries.   

 

A recent article about Mexico bears this out…

More Upside for March

In early February, stocks looked as though they were breaking down. We had just gotten through the Dubai debt problem. China was raising reserve requirements for banks to slow the rate of lending. And then the news about Greece’s debt problems broke.  The S&P 500 had dropped from January highs at 1,150 to as low as 1,044. That’s a 9% move, and if you recall it was enough to get investors a little nervous. In fact, some were even saying that the global economic rebound was done before it was even a year old.

It was about that time that I started including TradeMaster Daily Stock Alerts’ Jason Cimpl in our daily conversation here at Daily Profit.