What’s the death toll on the Federal Reserve Note currency crisis?

Right now, there’s a direct link between the actions of the Federal Reserve and the historical amounts of global strife.

The Arab Spring? That’s a direct fallout from the kind of vicious hegemony we’ve exported to the region. The deal we’ve had with these dictators? Dollars for oil, or we send in the troops.

Cheap and unstable dollars, not American troops, have been the undoing for dictators in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and now Syria.

What about riots in Greece? They’re a direct result of the idea that multi-national banking corporations CAN NOT fail – largely because they’re joined at the hip as member banks with the Federal Reserve.

Connect the dots from European banks to American banks. Greece isn’t being allowed to default – as it obviously should. Instead, the ECB and by extension, the Federal Reserve are forcing austerity on the Greek people in the form of higher taxes and a complete gutting of the Greek state.

Why? To protect the solvency of banks.

So that’s the why of it. Uncertainty about the U.S. dollar and its steady decline in purchasing power has created massive ripples-turned-tidal waves around the globe.

The how?

Well, when a small group of academics sit in a tiny room and decide the value of anything, no matter how smart they are or how great their models look, they will inevitably be viciously wrong.

And when the reality of the markets rears its head in the form of expensive produce in Tunisia or ridiculous claims on the output of broke Greeks as a couple of examples, then the fallout tends to be social strife.

Conversely, under a market-driven monetary unit – like gold for instance – you don’t see these types of waves. The supply of gold is steady and reliable. But there’s the problem: the world’s banker elites have a hard time controlling gold supply. Under the gold standard, central banks have to pursue austerity not as a remedy, but as a rule. Excess is quickly reined in, because as you spend your gold, you have to work hard to replace it or risk a run from your currency.

And because the buck literally stops with the buck (as in the dollar) it will not be long before we see our own version of Greek riots and Tunisian style discontent.

Published by Wyatt Investment Research at