Utah Returns to the Gold Standard

Lawmakers in New Hampshire, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia have
introduced bills that would allow them to mint their own currencies, or
otherwise allow for alternative currencies to settle debts both public
and private.

Utah recently passed a bill recognizing gold and silver as legal tender.

Texas Congressman Ron Paul recently introduced a bill which would allow
gold and silver (among other precious metals) to compete with Federal
Reserve notes.

The Fed Wants Inflation

Yesterday, the Fed said it was prepared to move on new
stimulus if the economy weakens further. What’s more, the Fed’s statement
that inflation is below levels it wants to see suggests that further easing
is coming. That’s a clear indication that the Fed is still worried about
deflation.

I suppose it’s a good sign that the Fed held off on new
easing action. But the Fed also failed to sound a confident tone about the
economic recovery, which I think is mistake.

Of course, we know the economy isn’t great. But most
economic data has improved over the last month or so. And it should be
understood that there is no magic bullet that puts millions of Americans back
to work. It’s going to take time, re-training and probably some government
incentives.

How Much for the Island?

Investing in gold is often called a “fear trade.” In times of crisis, it’s believed that gold will hold its value, and even rise, while the value of paper currencies and other assets fall.  

 

If you bought SPDR Gold ETF (NYSE:GLD), which seeks to track the price of physical gold, 2 years ago, you’d be up around 36%.   

 

The S&P 500 is down around 15% during that time.   

 

You probably already know that gold hit a new all-time high yesterday at $1,200 an ounce. And even though other traditional measures of fear – like the volatility index (VIX), bonds and even stocks – didn’t move much today, the move in gold can’t be ignored.